Summer gardening in the Santa Clarita Valley area

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burnt cannas  Sunburn can brown leaves when temperatures suddenly spike

Summer gardening in the Santa Clarita Valley area can be a challenge. There is an astonishingly wide range of microclimates in and around the city. Soils, humidity, sun intensity and even rainfall can vary considerably from one place to the next – sometimes even from one part of your property to another! But being inland chaparral, there are commonalities that make gardening in this part of Los Angeles County harder in the summertime than the rest of the year. Yet, if you love gardening, you don’t have to hide indoors all summer. Just plan around summer challenges. Keeping active in the garden will be good for you, your home, your garden and the environment. Here are some things to keep in mind.

garden hat holder

These garden hats are ready to go on their tree ‘hook’!

It gets hot!

The sun is intense in the inland chaparral. And we experience wide temperatures ranges that allow cooling at night. Too much sun has been proven dangerous to our skin, and overheating can cause sun stroke. That can make summer gardening less inviting than at other times of the year.

What you can do

This is one of the easier issues gardeners can handle. Simply take advantage of our nighttime temperature drops by working during the cooler hours of early morning and late afternoon. And to make working safer and more comfortable, wear protection. Add a hat, gloves and loosely fitting long-sleeved and leg-covering clothes. These will not only help protect from sun, but from scratches and insect bites. Wear a good sunscreen with a high pH. Closed-toe shoes will protect your feet from injury and absorbent socks will keep them more comfortable in the heat. Drink plenty of water to keep hydrated.

Wildfire view

A landscape view no one wants in their garden. So design your garden to be wildfire resistant!

We live in the land of wildfires!*

We were again reminded of our vulnerability, how easily fires start, how much fuel there is out there despite the drought, how quickly they spread, how greedily and cruelly they will consume anything they can, and how willingly they will invade even areas we might have thought safe. We are also learning there is no reliable fire season anymore, so don’t wait around for the autumn Santa Ana winds before you consider making your home safe.

What you can do

Clear any brush surrounding your home. Keep gutters, eaves, areas around your house – especially corners where we tend to pile things up – and gardens cleaned up. Remove wood piles near your house. Design your landscape for beauty, efficiency, productivity and safety. That includes fire breaks in your design, choose your materials and their placement carefully, use low profile plants, avoid highly flammable trees and position irrigation and water sources wisely.

wild rabbit

Rabbits are cute, but they can become very destructive in the summer garden.

Wildlife invasions

Temperatures have been gradually warming during the past half dozen years. Many insects that used to avoid our frosty winters have expanded their territory into our gardens. We are seeing mealy bugs, thrips, scale insects and more aphids than ever.

Snails are invading northern and eastern Santa Clarita Valley landscapes. And raccoons, not all that common twenty years ago, are now seen everywhere up through Acton. Coyotes and rabbits, mice and rats, tree and ground squirrels, gophers and more are exploding in population and feeding off of our lush gardens as their natural resources are vanishing under housing construction and drought.

Now, diseases that threaten the human and pet population are finding vectors to endanger our health. Mosquitoes are carrying an assortment of diseases rarely seen a decade ago, ticks are doing the same, and bats are bringing rabies into a city previously disease free.

What you can do

Planting, pruning and other garden work will clean your garden and take away homes where pests multiply. Using chemicals will encourage pests to build up resistance and those same chemicals can filter into our edibles, drinking water, entering our food chain and that of friendly wildlife. Whenever possible, use physical barriers to deter pests. Try sticky traps, sound and odor deterrents and if necessary, enclose your most delectable edible and decorative plants in half-inch hardware cloth. Block entry holes into your house where rodents will happily move in and multiply.

Comfortable outdoor chairs

These outdoor chairs invite you or your guests to relax comfortably in the sunshine.

Enjoy summer gardening and using your garden

Despite summer gardening challenges, the garden still has a lot to offer. Make time to use your garden. Grow edibles, relax in the shade to reduce stress. Play with the children and pets. Use your pool if you have one. Entertain friends during balmy evenings. And keep your body active and your mind at peace working in the garden. There are plenty of jobs that can be done even during the hot summer months.

What you can do in the garden

Keeping spent flowers cut off of plants before they set seed will redirect that seed-setting energy into more flowering. Pulling weeds while they are small will make the job easy. It will also avoid the big job of brush clearance to keep your home safe if a wildfire should threaten.

New plants can be planted at this time of year, especially California natives, cacti and succulents. They will need to be regularly watered (including the drought-tolerant natives) to help roots settle in, and more delicate plants will appreciate some shading for the first few weeks. Most cacti and succulents love being planted during the dry season of summer gardening, but some may still be burnt when exposed to sudden hot sun. Keep dead leaves, sticks and branches cleaned up to discourage pests as well as eliminating fire fuel.

WIldfire view

Destructive, fast-moving wildfires endanger life, homes and gardens

*An extra note regarding wildfires and fallout

If you have ash on your property from the Sand Fire (or any other), sweep or blow it from traffic areas so it won’t be inhaled or tracked into your house. You can then quickly wash the remaining soot into the soil. Areas directly impacted by high heat will experience deeper effects from fire, but landscapes with ash and soot fallout, will benefit from potassium, phosphorus and magnesium and a number of trace elements, as well as calcium (raising the already high pH of our soils).

Adding compost or soil sulfur will acidify the soil and help neutralize the effect of the calcium if your soil is already high in lime. For the most part, the rise in alkalinity will not be a problem and the rest of the additions will actually help enrich your soil. If your house or garden was directly reddened by Foscheck foam, lightly water the surface, then wash it away with a gentle spray. It is water soluble.

When it is hot outdoors, work inside. It’s a perfect opportunity to list what you want to plant when the weather cools in the autumn. You can also use the time to design/redesign your garden with tough plants, lawn replacements and non-living materials (like colored gravel, decomposed granite, or something more imaginative like shale pieces, recycled tumbled glass and more).

After all, it will be hot again next summer. If the trend keeps up, it may be even hotter and drier than this year. But rather than losing out on one of the most beneficial outdoor activities, summer gardening, adapt to the changes and turn your landscape into a comfortable, productive, fun, sustainable and just plain beautiful place to be – all year around!

Gardening is a living thing

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growing world

The Earth is a growing place!

Gardening is a living thing and as with all living things, nothing stays the same. We tend to perceive life through our experiences and often think what is now will always be – even if our logic tells us it isn’t so. But still we plant a garden and expect all the good parts to stay the same while we focus our attention on the parts we want to change. Now that we are beginning to accept even the weather patterns may be moving away from the expected, our view on gardening – like many other parts of our lives – has to become more flexible, too.

Also, because gardening is a living thing, to have a successful landscape means to expect a fair amount of trial and error. Every plant and every planning space is unique. Although a friend, neighbor – or even a trusted plant expert – may assure you that what has grown easily for him/her will do fine in your garden, it is never guaranteed. Experience has shown that one particular kind of plant that grows well in the same garden can languish in another, even though conditions appear to be the same. As if that’s not enough to rock our sense of security in the landscape, we have to deal with the fact that each plant, just like each person, is a little different. So it is entirely possible that an individual plant will be stronger, weaker or grow a little differently than others of the same type. Then there is the fact that even if the plants behave as expected, their surroundings may not. Pests can suddenly discover even long-time residents. It took years before the gophers in my garden area discovered (and destroyed) a group of roses and all the agaves on the hill (all untouched for over a dozen years). And once the ground squirrels happened by my outdoor vegetable patch that grew unmolested for over five years, no amount of protection could save the edibles from decimation. Sun exposures change, too, as surrounding trees grow or structures are added or removed.

If you love gardening, then the quirkiness of designing and maintaining a garden is half the fun. Nothing is entirely predictable. Some of the most exciting events happen when a plant that isn’t supposed to grow well thrives anyway, or a favorite plant seeds itself into perfect locations you’d never considered.

Part of acknowledging that gardening is a living thing is realizing that even the best areas will die or be overgrown in parts. Weather or pests can make a mess of well-controlled gardens. Trees or large shrubs are likely to grow in ways you didn’t count on. And most of all, no matter how long it took you to put your garden together, it will take no time at all for it to look awful if neglected!

When bigger issues impact our gardens – like the climate change we seem to be experiencing, being flexible can seem more daunting. Many people have given up on their gardens and lawns feeling overwhelmed by the impact of drought, flooding and temperature changes.

But we gardeners can be flexible and allowing our property to die off and become dust bowls will not only cheat us out of the joys of gardening, but will actually exacerbate the problem. Clearing land or leaving dead lawns then covering the surface with seas of gravel, cement or nothing at all will create heat sinks (or heat islands).

bad gravel landscaping

Poorly designed oceans of gravel create ugly landscapes that are bad for the home and bad for the environment.

Heat sinks reflect sun and raise temperatures around and in your home as well as in the outdoor environment. These lifeless areas do not help balance the oxygen and CO2 in the air (as plants do), lower humidity by denying the moisture provided by leaf transpiration, and encourage increasing winds to whip through uncontested. With heavy rain, such areas quickly erode away. If human beings are going to survive in high numbers on this planet, we need to take responsibility for the space we occupy. Ironically, this means gardening is a good thing so long as we make provisions for our needs, our aesthetic desires and the environment. This is not hard to do, but it does mean we have to look at a larger picture, design landscapes we can love – and so can the wildlife, our neighbors and Mother Earth.

There are millions of designs possible to create a dream garden that can improve our living conditions and help maintain nature’s balance. Start looking into all the possibilities a harmonious garden can offer. Ask for advice or hire labor when you need it. It is no longer “gardening-as-usual”. Start with the little things you already have. Don’t give up. Gardening is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself, your family, pets, and property. Design something new and exciting. Or start by just working with what you currently have. Either way, there are rewards for gardening with respect for living changes; your landscape will look better, be more productive, require less labor, save you money and be more fun to enjoy.

Romantic pool

A romantic swimming pool blends with the look and climate of this landscape.

Hot dry garden

Hot, dry climates can be homes to beautiful gardens, too.

Try to schedule regular upkeep in your landscape. Do the small things as an excuse to get out of the house or take a break from work. Gardening is a wonder-drug for the mind and body. It will also keep the little problems in the garden from becoming big ones. Call in regular help so maintenance doesn’t get away from you. Calling in a good gardener, landscaper, tree trimmer or other expert at least annually will keep the garden healthy and keep big issues from becoming even bigger. And expect to review your garden every few years to decide what areas are working and which ones are not. Climate changes happen, events occur, and even your lifestyle will likely be different as time goes on. Again, gardening is a living thing! Keep adjusting your garden so it works for you, not against you. We human beings have something in common with our landscapes: we are both alive and constantly changing. Adjusting for those changes makes for a better quality of life. And, for better or worse, it sure keeps things from getting boring!

Why water wise gardens need plants

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mix plants and nonliving materials for a balanced water wise garden

Water wise gardens need plants for good health, balance, usefulness and beauty.

In areas suffering from drought, homeowners and businesses are allowing lawns to die and open areas are being covered with gravel. The attempt to waste less water on landscaping is laudable. But sometimes taking the cheapest and easiest route to being water wise – like keeping a dead lawn or paving over everything with gravel – can create additional serious problems.

weeds in dead lawn

Weeds are the only beneficiaries of dead lawns.

There is a reason why experts encourage drought-tolerant gardens. Water wise gardens need plants. Green is good — not just meaning it’s good to be eco-friendly. But green growth is also good. Life and non-life are balanced on this planet. The systems can be quite complex, but simply put, all life needs water and most life naturally adapts to its environment. We humans have taken a path of our own by changing our surroundings to fit our needs. Sometimes we do what we like without considering the consequences. But since most people prefer their homes surrounded by plant life and Mother Nature concurs, we should be able to create landscapes both we and the ecology can love. We can find balance. Landscape is not an “all or nothing” proposition.

Open areas with no plant life become big absorbing grounds for solar heating. These spaces then radiate back heat into the air, further drying it. Low humidity makes it harder for anything to grow. So when dead lawns remain in place or spaces are covered with nothing but stone or gravel, heat islands are formed. This heat will raise the temperature not only of ambient air, but of the house itself, adding to your discomfort and air conditioning bills. This is not water wise, it is unwise.

Another problem with turning lawn or garden areas into dead zones is the dust that is created and pollutes the air when windy (often triggering allergies). Also, these spaces are uncomfortable on the feet, glaring and ugly to the eye and are an anathema to wildlife.

wildlife loves a well planted garden

This little hummingbird loves succulent flowers.

Dead lawn is depressing to look at and will fill with noxious weeds as soon as rain can germinate them. Gravel and stone can be gorgeous when designed by someone with an artistic eye and installed correctly. But when dumped and spread flat over open areas, it becomes dreary and a waste of resources – as well as creating heat islands. (Gravel and stone may be abundant on this planet, but it is still a non-renewable resource and if too large a human population demands it, we can create price gouging and damage to the environment as we have done with so many other natural resources.)

So what to do?

colorful drought tolerant plants

Plants add color and texture to the drought-tolerant landscape

Think of all the interesting useful spaces you can create in your landscape — like extending your living space, playing games, entertaining, growing edibles, building a relaxing retreat or watching wildlife in a colorful native garden. Create a garden that uses lawn only where it is useful. Replace the rest with adaptable plant life and well-designed non-living materials. When well designed, non-living materials, practical spaces and greenery (that can bloom in a rainbow of colors) can all work together to complement each other. Use non-living materials swirled and punctuated with water wise or native plantings that harmonize visually and practically. A mixed landscape is not only more functional, it is comfortable for living, works sustainably with the surrounding environment and it can be decorative — and even downright gorgeous.

Growing the ‘New Climate’ garden

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rain clouds

A well designed garden will thrive with rain or drought.

As the weather becomes more extreme all over the world, polar ice caps melt, technology shrinks distance with instant communications and the biggest population of human beings ever to walk the earth are now traveling from one place to the next transporting lifeforms of all types planet-wide, Mother Nature is finding her own ways to adapt to a changing world. We can individually reclaim harmony and sanity with a sustainable garden to adapt to nature’s changes.

mixed vegetables

A crop of mixed vegetables from a small garden

We need to look at the bigger picture. Gardening, something too many people are ignoring in the frantic demands of everyday scheduling, is quietly becoming one of humanity’s greatest tools for survival. Food production is changing. Profitability has thus far triumphed over sustainability and long term human health. So avoiding chemical and hormonal additives as well as eating nourishing fruits and vegetables is now a project for each individual. Chemical pollution (plenty of which is added by the home gardener) threatens water resources – again something we individuals can impact. And so many diseases are being traced back to the stress we impose on ourselves – another area where our gardens can help us heal.

Whether your local area is experiencing cold, heat, dry or wet weather, you can grow a garden that will help you and your family to grow a ‘New Climate’ garden that can make a difference to your quality of life. You can deal with extreme weather by designing good drainage and places to trap and store water.

rain barrel

Rain barrels can blend with attractive landscapes.

You can build in protected areas to shelter your favorite plants from too much cold or heat and even recycle old tubs and glass shower doors, turning them into protective vegetable gardens or cloches to extend your food growing season. (Recycling will save you from having to buy new materials while increasing trash in your home or in landfills.) Add decorative umbrellas or overhangs to provide shade from hot sun. Or plant in pots (or creative recycled containers like old sinks, broken fountains or even old toilets for a bit of humor) in sunny spots in gardens that have too much shade.

 

Comfortable outdoor chairs

These outdoor chairs beckon visitors to relax comfortably in the sunshine.

Look to your garden to extend your living space, add a place for rest and relaxation, meditation, play, hobbies, entertainment, outdoor rooms, sports and whatever else can give your mind and body a chance to heal from daily stress. There is always some nook you can fill with herbs, a dwarf fruit tree in a pot, a favorite vegetable – or a whole vegetable garden for fresh, healthy food. Surround yourself with beauty. In our fast-paced techno-society we are losing the magic of fine arts, replacing them with quick, cheap forms of immediate gratification and we seem to be finding ourselves more impatient, angry and frustrated than ever. Surround yourself with the shapes and colors of nature’s garden and in will fly birds to supply natural music and butterflies to brighten your heart. We are learning how very important ‘mindfulness’ is to our mental and physical health. Ironically, we have everything we need provided for us naturally. We can then add our human ingenuity to create works of art, spaces for fun and activity and centers for delicious food, rest and relaxation and places to share our ideas, laughter and love.

backyard entertaining

Design your yard to entertain.

Yes, the ‘New Climate’ may be changing the weather, but it’s larger than that: it is a loss of being grounded to the bigger picture of life. There are so many great ideas to help you create a thriving garden despite changes in weather. You don’t have to look far to enrich your life by balancing the speed and demands of the changing technology and social climate with the secrets of wisdom mankind has known for thousands of years. Look to your own garden. You may find you can thrive better with your own version of a new climate to grow in!

Save your garden in the California drought!

pathway

Use pavers in patterns to form a pathway in a useful area that needs no water in a California drought landscape.

How to grow a spectacular garden despite the California drought

Changing weather patterns are making headlines all over the country. While gripping cold and smothering snow and ice may grab the headlines, a quieter and more insidious weather phenomenon is making dangerous inroads on the West Coast: the California drought.

Three years ago the winter rainy season was stingy in California. Last year many spots broke records for lack of rainfall. This year the whole state is water-deprived and the open lands remain barren of green. Snow packs are severely low and life-giving water is not falling from the skies.  In the normally wettest month of the year there was no measurable precipitation.

Life can survive most extreme weather, but it can’t exist without water. As homeowners continue to spray lawns and gardens with automatic sprinkler systems, starving wildlife has begun invading houses and gardens in search of food and drink. And the ‘dry season’ hasn’t yet arrived.

The first impact will be seen on our gardens. Water restrictions are likely and supply prices will soar. Maintaining the average California garden will become expensive and difficult. So far we are being asked to voluntarily cut back on water usage 20%. This is not enough.

Even now, farmers are unable to plant their usual crops and due to escalating feed prices stock herds are being culled — meaning less meat supplies in the future. This will inevitably push up food costs across the board all over the country. Yet with the large population on the West Coast, drinking water must be a priority.

Californians will finally take this seriously when they see their water bills triple and are subject to rationing. No one wants to see their groomed front yards go brown or watch their landscapes die. But the gardens are going to be the first victims of a severe drought.

So with this dire outlook, what can we do?

Happily, this is the time to reinvent your landscaping – now, before the heat of spring and summer arrives. Your garden can look spectacular no matter what Mother Nature sends your way. Yes, cactus gardens are a good solution and can be designed to look great. But if that isn’t your style, there are other alternatives. Here are some approaches you can use to turn your outdoor space into something you’ll love that won’t drain the precious water supply – and will still look wonderful should the rains come.

Give up the lawn! Lawns were never native to California and there are many other options that will be ornamental and/or productive. Replace them with artistic patterns of colored gravel, brick, stone, decomposed granite or even tumbled glass. Or use artificial grass where you really want an area of lawn. Synthetic lawns are safer and more realistic than ever before. There are also ground cover plants like Dymondia and some of the eco-lawn seed mixtures that will be less thirsty for areas that must be green.

cactus landscape

Slab rocks and cactus plants gives a contemporary look to this Southern California garden that will easily survive the California drought.

Plant California drought-tolerant plants or plants from other parts of the world with a similar climate. Group plantings to create lush effects and surround them with non-living materials.

Build raised garden beds for edibles so the water is focused where you need it and not spilled away elsewhere. These beds can be defended from hungry wildlife with fencing and wire.

edible front yard

Raised vegetable gardens can look lovely and be productive. This yard is grown by Rosalind Creasy

Carve out useful spaces like entertainment patios, seating and dining areas, sport courts, outdoor rooms, child or pet play areas or decorative dry river beds. They use no water and expand living space.

Make your garden magical with art. Add sculptures, build colorful shade structures or pop in a small fountain of recycled water to calm the mind with the illusion of bountiful moisture (while using very little).

Provide deep watering for your trees since these are the hardest to replace if you lose living material in your landscape. Dig in deep tube feeders and line moats with slow-delivery soaker hoses.

‘Redesign’, ‘prioritize’, and ‘get creative’ are the catch-words that will help you create an artistic and low-water garden.

Saving water in a California drought will not only make your garden withstand dry years but it will save you maintenance labor and money. Using wisely chosen plants where they will have the greatest visual impact, surrounding them with non-living materials and adding interesting décor will make your property safer from wildfires and less dusty from winds while creating a three-dimensional artistic landscape.

This is the real point of “sustainable” gardening. The extreme drought gives us an excuse to try out real water-wise gardening and allows us to flex our creative thinking muscles. If even half of the California residential homes converted their gardens to this kind of redesign, even our severely reduced water supply would be a much smaller threat to the population. According to the Association of California Water Agencies, 50% of residential water use goes to outdoor landscapes. The percentage increases with the drier inland communities. We can make a difference in our personal lives and the welfare of the whole state during this extreme drought – and even after – by designing our gardens wisely.

So take a moment: what improvements can you make in your own garden for the California drought? How can you make your property more spectacular, less water-dependent, easier to care for, and more sustainable? Why not take the first steps now, while the temperatures are cool and comfortable so you will be ready to sit back and enjoy your smart but beautiful garden when the heat sets in? You can grow that, enjoy it and reap the benefits. As the gardens of your neighbors succumb to dry and heat, yours can remain beautiful and you can be the envy of the neighborhood!

Eat new vegetables and fruits for good health and sustainable agriculture

Here is an article courtesy of  Dan Grifen that addresses our eating habits. Eating new and diverse vegetables and fruits is not only good for our health, but can have a major effect on the ‘greening of the planet’ and sustainable agriculture. Here’s what Dan writes:

Sustainability Through the Consumption of Things Conserved

“In other environmental issues we tell people to stop something, reduce their impact, reduce their damage,” – US Ecologist Gary Nabham.

Since the beginning of the green movement, there has been a rise in the number of organizations and businesses that are doing their part in the promotion of sustainability through conservation. As human beings, we’re told to reduce our carbon footprint, consume less unhealthy foods, and spend less time in the shower! But let’s take a minute to step back and look at this from a different perspective; one that Gary Nabham strongly suggests.

Gary Paul Nabham, phD., is a Arab-American writer/conservationist whose extensive farming work in the U.S./Mexico borderlands region has made him world renowned. Specifically speaking, Nabham is known for his work in biodiversity as an ethnobotanist. His uplifting messages and attitude towards life and culture has granted us access to multiple beneficial theories including his latest of eat what you conserve.

According to The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, about three quarters of the genetic diversity of crops been vanishing over the last century and that a dozen species now gives 90% of the animal protein eaten globally. In accordance, just 4 crop species supply half of plant based calories in the human diet.

Nabham claims that by eating the fruits and vegetables that we are attempting to conserve/save, we’re promoting the granular dissemination of various plant species. But this goes beyond what we typically buy in supermarkets, particularly because of price and abundance. We must remember to try new things and immerse ourselves in the very concept of diversity. Keep in mind- the benefits of splurging for that costly fruit/vegetable supremely outweigh the cons. Not only are you promoting biodiversity and further eliminating the needs of farmers to remove rare, less purchased crops off their agenda, but you’re also effectively encouraging healthier lifestyles.
Agriculturist Marco Contiero mentioned that “biodiversity is an essential characteristic of any sustainable agricultural system, especially in the context of climate change.”[1] With sustainable crop efforts being lead by the CGI (Clinton Global Initiative) and the IRRI (International Rice Research Institute) the duo plans to provide a more sustainable crop that can withstand natural disasters, avoiding food shortages like Haiti is experiencing. Contiero goes on to state “We need to ensure this is the basis for the future…” – This is exactly what Doug Band, the CGI, and the IRRI are doing by engaging in sustainability efforts.

So remember, next time you’re in the supermarket picking out navel oranges or strawberries, turn your attention to something that’s a bit more “out of season,” or exotic in nature. The same goes for salads/salad ingredients; shop outside the norm, picking spices and vegetables that you wouldn’t normally incorporate into your everyday diet. During such economic downtime it isn’t always easy to maintain the same level of grocery shopping intrigue, but we must also not forget that in this sundry of foods we can find fun!

Dan Grifen – Supporter of all things green and progressive.

You can read more from Dan at http://everythingleft.wordpress.com/ or find him on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/d_grifen